apsies:

Cole Nelson, nine months, held by his mother Deborah Nelson, inspects President Barack Obama’s face during a visit to the Iowa State Fair on August 13, 2012.

apsies:

Cole Nelson, nine months, held by his mother Deborah Nelson, inspects President Barack Obama’s face during a visit to the Iowa State Fair on August 13, 2012.

Hey, I resemble that remark!

Bloom’s long bucolic sneer seems to have invited national interest along with Iowan indignation. Some have even gone line-by-line. Others hope to capitalize on the fury. The best of course is this from Iowahawk.

Cow chipping away at the story, we may want to remember that many of those stereotypical outdated Midwestern morals may have more to do with the next American President than you can dip in butter and put on a stick.

Fur-real Feline Frenzy in Iowa
CLINTON, IOWA — Recently the Clinton Humane Society in Clinton, Iowa  became one of only five shelters in the world to launch an interactive  kitten room with cutting-edge technology known as i-Pet Companion™,  created by a company in Idaho known as AliceVISION™, a branch of Apriori  LLC. i-Pet Companion is free to the public and has already boosted  adoptions, donations, and sponsorships.
With this technology, people around the globe will be able to  operate a remote camera and robotic toys via their computer mouse,  allowing them to play in “real time” with the kittens at the Clinton  shelter while they wait for a new “furever” home.
Click here to see the Crazy Clinton Cats in action. What’s new pussycat?

Fur-real Feline Frenzy in Iowa

CLINTON, IOWA — Recently the Clinton Humane Society in Clinton, Iowa became one of only five shelters in the world to launch an interactive kitten room with cutting-edge technology known as i-Pet Companion™, created by a company in Idaho known as AliceVISION™, a branch of Apriori LLC. i-Pet Companion is free to the public and has already boosted adoptions, donations, and sponsorships.

With this technology, people around the globe will be able to operate a remote camera and robotic toys via their computer mouse, allowing them to play in “real time” with the kittens at the Clinton shelter while they wait for a new “furever” home.

Click here to see the Crazy Clinton Cats in action. What’s new pussycat?

thedailywhat:

Fried Fair Fare of the Day: Come on down to the Iowa State Fair, where the latest fried fad is a stick of battered butter, deep-fried and glazed.

On second thought, stay as far away from the Iowa State Fair as geography will allow.

[eater.]

Must. See. Butter Cow.

(Source: thedailywhat)

"I’m a substantive, serious person and I have a strong background.” Michele Bachmann said on CNN’s “American Morning.”
Jim Schuman, now an Eyota, Minnesota farmer, served as president of the Winona State University student senate in 1977 while Bachmann was vice president. Schuman said she was a “cute, talkative and perky girl” with conservative tendencies. “She didn’t party like a lot of us did.”
And Obama fears her. 
This is starting to be a fun race.

"I’m a substantive, serious person and I have a strong background.” Michele Bachmann said on CNN’s “American Morning.”

Jim Schuman, now an Eyota, Minnesota farmer, served as president of the Winona State University student senate in 1977 while Bachmann was vice president. Schuman said she was a “cute, talkative and perky girl” with conservative tendencies. “She didn’t party like a lot of us did.”

And Obama fears her

This is starting to be a fun race.

Iowa woman wasn’t attacked by cow

The Benton County sheriff’s office says Jean Fee was found in a pasture on June 18 where she and her grandson had been feeding the cows. She died at a Cedar Rapids hospital.

Earlier reports were that one of the cows had attacked her.

"We have a few instances of [cow attacks] across the country every year — but it’s uncommon. For it to result in a fatality is very uncommon,"  Terry Engelken, an associate professor at Iowa State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, told Monday’s Des Moines Register.

Jim Fee says his wife died of a massive stroke and was not attacked by a cow.

The sheriff’s office says family members haven’t had trouble with the cows before.

Remember those undercover photos and videos of animal abuse and  environmental damage at factory farms? Under a proposed Iowa law,  broadcasting (and even possessing) these images would be a crime.
Stop Iowa’s Anti-Farm Whistleblower Bill.
Don’t let Big Ag keep us in the dark.  This bill will protect the rights of photographers and publishers of photos who take pictures of factory farming.

Remember those undercover photos and videos of animal abuse and environmental damage at factory farms? Under a proposed Iowa law, broadcasting (and even possessing) these images would be a crime.

Stop Iowa’s Anti-Farm Whistleblower Bill.

Don’t let Big Ag keep us in the dark.  This bill will protect the rights of photographers and publishers of photos who take pictures of factory farming.


First hatch 4/2/11.
24-hour collage of first egg pip and hatch
Second hatch 4/3/2011.
First glimpse of second hatchling
Third hatch expected in a couple of days.

The Raptor Resource Project brings you the Decorah Eagles from atop their tree at the fish hatchery in Decorah, Iowa.

DECORAH, Iowa (AP) —- A new video camera watching a bald eagle’s nest in Northeast Iowa offers new views of the eagles’ domestic life —- and what’s to come.
The camera, which pans, tilts and zooms, is above the nest near the Decorah Fish Hatchery. It’s part of a technology upgrade, which also includes a main nest camera.
Bob Anderson is the director of Raptor Resource Project, which sponsors the eagle cams. He said the new camera, which he controls with a joystick, will allow viewers to watch eagle eggs cracking open later this year and see close-up details of the eagles feeding the chicks.
The eagle pair built the nest about four years ago, and raised eight chicks in the last three years.
To see the eagle, to to www.raptorresource.org.

DECORAH, Iowa (AP) —- A new video camera watching a bald eagle’s nest in Northeast Iowa offers new views of the eagles’ domestic life —- and what’s to come.

The camera, which pans, tilts and zooms, is above the nest near the Decorah Fish Hatchery. It’s part of a technology upgrade, which also includes a main nest camera.

Bob Anderson is the director of Raptor Resource Project, which sponsors the eagle cams. He said the new camera, which he controls with a joystick, will allow viewers to watch eagle eggs cracking open later this year and see close-up details of the eagles feeding the chicks.

The eagle pair built the nest about four years ago, and raised eight chicks in the last three years.

To see the eagle, to to www.raptorresource.org.