tetw:

by Bruce Barcott

Monster earthquakes are going off all around the Pacific Ocean’s Ring of Fire. Is the West Coast of North America next?

Notwithstanding the 7.7 Earthquake in British Columbia on Sat., October 27th, 2012; this is still an interesting article from August 2011.

(Source: tetw)

discoverynews:

When people fled Fukushima and other parts of Japan a year ago, thousands of pets were left behind. While many pets have since been reunited with their owners, a horrific situation still exists in the no-go 12.5-mile radiation zone around the damaged nuclear plants.

There, homeless dogs and cats are still wandering around the area, according to World Vets founder and CEO Cathy King. She told Discovery News that  “a lot of these animals have since been rescued out, but some remain.”

The problem demonstrates how difficult recovery has been after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake that struck off the northeast coast of Japan on March 11, 2011.

The resulting tsunami and nuclear woes devastated the area. Animal support teams from all over the world descended upon the region and are still trying to improve the situation.

More images and information about the rescue efforts here

(via npr)

Woman in Iconic Tsunami Photo Looks to Future
LEFT: Yuko Sugimoto, looking in the direction of her son Raito’s destroyed kindergarten building which was partly submerged and surrounded by piles of debris. Nearly two days after the quake she had yet to find the four-year-old. “At that point, I thought there was only about a 50 percent chance he was alive.”
RIGHT: Nearly a year later, Sugimoto stood in the same place, embracing her son.  Her smile suggests that her life is back on track, but that is not true. Though the debris has been cleared, their lives are financially burdened. Their house was submerged nearly to its second floor and they lost most of their belongings. What remains is a 31-year-mortgage of around 25 million yen ($310,000) they still have to pay.
Photo Credits: 
REUTERS/Tadashi Okubo, Yomiuri Shimbun 3/13/11REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao 2/22/12  

Woman in Iconic Tsunami Photo Looks to Future

LEFT: Yuko Sugimoto, looking in the direction of her son Raito’s destroyed kindergarten building which was partly submerged and surrounded by piles of debris. Nearly two days after the quake she had yet to find the four-year-old. “At that point, I thought there was only about a 50 percent chance he was alive.”

RIGHT: Nearly a year later, Sugimoto stood in the same place, embracing her son.  Her smile suggests that her life is back on track, but that is not true. Though the debris has been cleared, their lives are financially burdened. Their house was submerged nearly to its second floor and they lost most of their belongings. What remains is a 31-year-mortgage of around 25 million yen ($310,000) they still have to pay.

Photo Credits: 

REUTERS/Tadashi Okubo, Yomiuri Shimbun 3/13/11
REUTERS/
Yuriko Nakao 2/22/12  

lickystickypickyme:

This picture from the tsunami disaster in Japan almost makes it seem as if Nature is playing with our man-made toys.But Nature has NO idea how to play with these toys.
And just like in real life, we (the other kid) end up crying.Photograph by Yomiuri Shimbun

More amazing in the years to come will be the wreckage which could hit shorelines from California to Alaska.

lickystickypickyme:

This picture from the tsunami disaster in Japan almost makes it seem as if Nature is playing with our man-made toys.
But Nature has NO idea how to play with these toys.

And just like in real life, we (the other kid) end up crying.

Photograph by Yomiuri Shimbun

More amazing in the years to come will be the wreckage which could hit shorelines from California to Alaska.

(Source: lickystickypickyshe)

dailyrenegade:

liberalsarecool:

producermatthew:

New video filmed by an amateur photographer of the large tsunami that swept through Japan one month ago. In the film, villagers from an unknown town in the Miyagi Prefecture could be seen running for their lives away from a large wave of water, cars and homes.

Unreal.

Scary stuff.

(Source: matthewkeys)

Tags: tsunami

toliveanddieinlondon:

This is Hideaki Akaiwa. When the Tsunami hit his home town of Ishinomaki, Hideaki was at work. Realising his wife was trapped in their home, he ignored the advice of professionals, who told him to wait for the army to arrive to provide search and rescue.
Instead he found some scuba gear, jumped in the raging torrent - dodging cars, houses and other debris being dragged around by the powerful current, any of which could have killed him instantly - and navigated the now submerged streets in pitch dark, freezing water until he found his house. Swimming inside, he discovered his wife alive on the upper level with only a small amount of breathing room, and sharing his respirator, pulled her out to safety.
If he had waited for the army, his wife of 20 years would be dead.
Oh, and if that’s not enough badassery for one lifetime, Hideaki realised his mother was also unaccounted for, so jumped back in the water and managed to save her life also. Since then Hideaki enters the water everyday on a one man search and rescue mission, saving countless lives and proving that two natural disasters in a single day - and insurmountable odds - can’t stand in the way of love. This man is my hero.

I am in awe of this man. This would make a great movie.

toliveanddieinlondon:

This is Hideaki Akaiwa. When the Tsunami hit his home town of Ishinomaki, Hideaki was at work. Realising his wife was trapped in their home, he ignored the advice of professionals, who told him to wait for the army to arrive to provide search and rescue.

Instead he found some scuba gear, jumped in the raging torrent - dodging cars, houses and other debris being dragged around by the powerful current, any of which could have killed him instantly - and navigated the now submerged streets in pitch dark, freezing water until he found his house. Swimming inside, he discovered his wife alive on the upper level with only a small amount of breathing room, and sharing his respirator, pulled her out to safety.

If he had waited for the army, his wife of 20 years would be dead.

Oh, and if that’s not enough badassery for one lifetime, Hideaki realised his mother was also unaccounted for, so jumped back in the water and managed to save her life also. Since then Hideaki enters the water everyday on a one man search and rescue mission, saving countless lives and proving that two natural disasters in a single day - and insurmountable odds - can’t stand in the way of love. This man is my hero.

I am in awe of this man. This would make a great movie.

A  survivor walks in the devastated city of Onagawa, Iwate prefecture,  northeastern Japan, Friday, March 25, 2011, after an powerful earthquake  and resulting tsunami devastated the area two weeks ago. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Police said the official death toll jumped past 10,000 on Friday (3/25/11). With the cleanup and recovery operations continuing and more than 17,400  listed as missing, the final number of dead was expected to surpass  18,000.

Tomohiko Abe, a machinist at the local atomic  plant, “We finally got electricity a day or two ago, but water is still a problem,” he said.
"It’s still like I’m in a dream," he said. "People say it’s like a movie, but it’s been worse than any movie I’ve ever seen."

A survivor walks in the devastated city of Onagawa, Iwate prefecture, northeastern Japan, Friday, March 25, 2011, after an powerful earthquake and resulting tsunami devastated the area two weeks ago. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Police said the official death toll jumped past 10,000 on Friday (3/25/11). With the cleanup and recovery operations continuing and more than 17,400 listed as missing, the final number of dead was expected to surpass 18,000.

Tomohiko Abe, a machinist at the local atomic plant, “We finally got electricity a day or two ago, but water is still a problem,” he said.

"It’s still like I’m in a dream," he said. "People say it’s like a movie, but it’s been worse than any movie I’ve ever seen."

producermatthew:

A Japan Self-Defense Forces officer smiles as he holds a four-month-old  baby girl who was rescued along with her family members from their home  in Ishimaki City, Miyagi Prefecture in northern Japan, after an  earthquake and tsunami struck the area, March 14, 2011. (Reuters)
In a statement on the current crisis in Japan Thursday afternoon, President Obama made a reference to the story of a four-month-old baby girl found alive amid the debris of the tsunami. The President said she was swept out of the arms of her parents when the tsunami hit.

producermatthew:

A Japan Self-Defense Forces officer smiles as he holds a four-month-old baby girl who was rescued along with her family members from their home in Ishimaki City, Miyagi Prefecture in northern Japan, after an earthquake and tsunami struck the area, March 14, 2011. (Reuters)

In a statement on the current crisis in Japan Thursday afternoon, President Obama made a reference to the story of a four-month-old baby girl found alive amid the debris of the tsunami. The President said she was swept out of the arms of her parents when the tsunami hit.

(Source: matthewkeys)

This is a story of one family in Japan …

It is a story I need to tell and it is meant as a tribute to the indomitable spirit of the people of that stricken country - to let our friends in Japan know that we are thinking of them!

A friend of mine lives in Ishinomaki (a major fishing port not far from Sendai).

I won’t name her - she is entitled to her privacy - but I got to know her while she was studying spoken English here in Australia. She went back to Japan for a holiday late last year and, for various reasons, decided to stay there.

I was horrified when I heard the first news of the ‘quake and the tsunami.  And then the pictures and videos started to appear …

The early reports said that my friend and family were “unaccounted for” but that was not an automatic death notice.  Then I got a report that her father and sister were safe in their relatively-undamaged home but that she had taken her mother into town for a medical appointment. My heart sank … she could not have survived …

The rest of the day went past in the depths of despair. But then my mobile ‘phone started going berserk with messages. She was alive!

I was out riding my bicycle at the time and had to stop as tears filled my eyes. In truth, I sat on a grass verge and bawled my eyes out.

It took a while but I managed to piece together her story from several
sources.

As soon as it was safe and while the ground was still shaking, my friend grabbed her mother and headed for higher ground. She had a plan, as, I suspect, many Japanese people do. She knew what was probably coming and knew exactly where to go.

They arrived at a school, raced in and yelled at everybody to get to the top floors.

When they looked towards the ocean, they saw the tsunami start to move in. It didn’t take long and the school grounds were soon under a few feet of water. But it was the tsunami’s last gasp. They were safe!

The water eventually went down enough for them to go outside and scrape “HELP” and “SOS” in the mud but they were cut-off.

They had drinking water but no food and they weren’t rescued for more than two days.

Their rescuers gave them a hot meal of rice and fish, and started getting people to their homes, if they were still standing, or to rescue centres.  Several of the children at the school were now orphans …

My friend and her mother had been told that the rest of the family was safe but I don’t think the news had got back the other way. I can only imagine the reunion scene.

I worked for many years in TV news and I’ve seen many disasters and much human suffering. I’ve tried to learn how to insulate myself (with limited success).

It was, perhaps, barely possible to hear what was happening in Japan and feel somewhat remote … unaffected.

But when you know and care about somebody who is there, when you have thought them dead and then found them alive, the mask, the insulating layer is stripped aside.

I am devastated and we’ve seen only the start …

And now it is snowing.

My heart goes out to you, and to all of Japan. There is little that I can do. But I want you and your friends to know that there are people around the world who care. You are all in my thoughts!

R. N.
Melbourne, Australia
jeffcagle:

This photo was taken on the fourth floor of a hospital hit by last week’s tsunami. Photo by Andrew Burton for USA Today.

 There are now some 390,000 people in eight prefectures staying in shelters.

jeffcagle:

This photo was taken on the fourth floor of a hospital hit by last week’s tsunami. Photo by Andrew Burton for USA Today.

 There are now some 390,000 people in eight prefectures staying in shelters.

(Source: jeffcagle)

Tags: Japan Tsunami

The following is a report from a Yomiuri Shimbun staff writer stationed in Miyagi Prefecture’s Kesennuma, which was hit by a massive tsunami caused by the earthquake that hit northern Japan on Friday.

producermatthew:

The following content related to the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis in Japan was published between Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning:

(Source: matthewkeys)

Pentagon: Some Troops In Japan Given Potassium Iodide

producermatthew:

No United States service members currently conducting relief missions in Japan are showing symptoms of radiation poisoning, but some crew members are being given Potassium Iodide tablets as a precaution, the Pentagon said Wednesday.

Additionally, the Pentagon said US forces in Japan are not permitted within 50 miles of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant without special authorization.

(Information via Reuters)

(Source: matthewkeys)

A tsunami victim examines the devastation in her house in Rikuzen-Takata, Iwate Prefecture.
People living in the devastated areas hit by Friday’s massive earthquake  are now facing various challenges in their lives, in addition to the  urgent need for rescue activities.

A tsunami victim examines the devastation in her house in Rikuzen-Takata, Iwate Prefecture.

People living in the devastated areas hit by Friday’s massive earthquake are now facing various challenges in their lives, in addition to the urgent need for rescue activities.